Jane Haining: Scot who died at Auschwitz honoured in Budapest

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Source – BBC News A Scot who gave her life to help protect Jewish schoolgirls during World War Two is to be honoured in her adopted city 73 years after she died.
Jane Haining will be the focus of a new exhibition in the Holocaust Memorial Centre in Budapest. Spokesman Zoltan Toth-Heinmann said the Church of Scotland missionary, who grew up in Dunscore, near Dumfries, was a "unique and important" figure.
He said her inspirational story had been "neglected" in the city.
As matron at the Scottish Mission school in Budapest during the 1930s and 40s, she refused to return home despite advice from church officials, saying the children needed her in the "days of darkness".
She was arrested in 1944, charged with working amongst Jews and taken to Auschwitz-Birkenau extermination camp in Nazi-occupied Poland, where she died aged 47.
She was posthumously honoured by the UK government for "preserving life in the face of persecution".

Read the whole article on http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-south-scotland-40900805

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From Deprivation of Rights to Genocide

To the Memory of the Victims of the Hungarian Holocaust The theme of the permanent exhibition is the Holocaust in Hungary. Its aim is to present and describe the persecution, suffering and murdering of Hungarian citizens, Jews and Roma, doomed to be exterminated on the basis of a racist ideology. The leading idea of the exhibition is to shed light on the relation between...

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Did You Know?

How many names are engraved to the Wall of Victims?

How can be names included to the list of identified victims?

Identification of more than half a million of victims of the Hungarian Holocaust requires persistent research efforts. At this moment, names of some 175,000 victims are engraved to the Wall.

Work on further identification of the names continues. It will be impossible to identify each and every victim, thus anonym, symbolic nametags are also placed on the Wall.

Visitors of the Memorial Center and visitors of the Center’s website can search the digital database of the victims. By filling in the Personal Data Form of the victims and returning it to our Institution, relatives or persons that have information about the victim, can initiate engraving the name to the Wall.

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